1st June 2011 Toronto, Canada

May in Canadian science

This month’s SIN Newsletter, covering science and technology news in Canada, is out! Click here to download the PDF version. If you would like to be added to the mailing list and receive it automatically in your inbox, leave a comment below or send us an e-mail.

This is John Preece assisting Nicole Arbour on the SIN newsletter and blog. Some highlights from May’s news are:

2011 Canada Gairdner Award recipients | Canada’s Gairdner Awards are among the most prestigious prizes in biomedical science, and one of this year’s recipients is from the University of Edinburgh. We hope to be able to cover the awards ceremony in October.

That anxiety may be in your gut, not in your head | Researchers at McMaster University have discovered that gut bacteria can influence brain chemistry, supporting associations between gastrointestinal disorders and mental health issues.

Crowdsourcing science: Researcher uses Facebook to identify thousands of fish | With just days to identify over 5,000 specimens of fish from an ichthyological survey of a Guyanese river, a University of Toronto Scarborough researcher got results from Facebook.

Is this Goodnight? | White-nose syndrome, a fungal infection that has driven little brown bats to near-extinction in areas of the USA, has come to Canada. What are scientists doing to help?

Study says Athabasca pollution near oilsands is increasing | The Athabasca River near Alberta’s oilsands region is becoming increasingly contaminated with hydrocarbons.

Teaching methods: An alternative vote | Researchers at the University of British Columbia have boosted exam performance by inverting the traditional lecturing model, focusing more on problem-solving and groupwork.

Remember that you can also keep up with Canadian science news on the UKinCanada Delicious feed, and with us and the rest of the UKinCanada team on Facebook, FlickrTwitter and YouTube. See you next month!

About John Preece

I cover science and innovation for Ontario (excluding Ottawa), liaising with all relevant research institutions and companies. In 2015 I expect to be working on future cities, high-performance computing and…

I cover science and innovation for Ontario (excluding Ottawa), liaising with all relevant research institutions and companies. In 2015 I expect to be working on future cities, high-performance computing and innovation in healthcare, as well as continuing prior work on dementia, regenerative medicine and science outreach. In the free time that I have after managing multiple small children, I enjoy home improvement and board/computer gaming. You can follow me on Twitter at @jcpreece